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Paperwork Checklists for Intergovernmental Actions – Enforcement

This chart lists all the alternative types of action that are possible for intergovernmental cases that need enforcement. To use it, find the alternative or alternatives that apply to the particular case you are dealing with. You will then see the corresponding documents required by law or regulation for that alternative, and where to send them.

Standard intergovernmental forms are listed in bold type; other documents are listed in plain type.

Enforcement

To do this: You need these forms and/or documents: And (if it is a IV-D case) you send them to:
Apply an administrative enforcement process. (Your state enforces using your state’s order or a third state’s order.) The documents (form letters, notices, etc) that your state uses for the particular process. The people and/or places they are normally sent to when the process is applied.
Bring a violation/contempt proceeding in your state. A local petition/pleading, and any other documents that are regularly used for enforcement in local cases in your state. The local tribunal in your state.
Ask another state to enforce its own order.
  1. CSE Transmittal #1.
  2. Child Support Agency Confidential Information Form
  3. See the note at the bottom of this page.*
The ICR in the state that you want to enforce the order.
Ask another state to administratively enforce an order without registration. You must send the same documents that you would if you were registering the order; therefore, see the documents listed for “register an order for enforcement only”. The ICR in the state that you want to administratively enforce the order.
Register an order for enforcement only.
  1. CSE Transmittal #1
  2. Child Support Agency Confidential Information Form
  3. Letter of Transmittal Requesting Registration
  4. One certified copy of the order that’s entitled to be the controlling order (this is the order that should be registered [or enforced without registration, if that option is used])
  5. one regular photocopy of the order that’s
    entitled to be the controlling order (if sending by regular mail and not EDE).
  6. See the note at the bottom of this page.*
The ICR in the state where you want the order to be registered.
Establish a new order in your state using long-arm jurisdiction when there are existing multiple orders, but no order is controlling.
  1. A local petition/pleading, and any other documents that are regularly used for establishment in local cases in your state.
  2. One certified copy of each existing order.
The local tribunal in your state.
Establish a new order in the obligor’s state using the two-state process when there are existing multiple orders but no order is controlling.
  1. CSE Transmittal #1
  2. Child Support Agency Confidential Information Form
  3. Uniform Support Petition
  4. General Testimony (completed by CP)
  5. one certified copy of each existing order
  6. a payment record and/or affidavit of
    arrears for each existing order
The ICR in the obligor’s state.

* Note: If the case has multiple orders for current support now in effect, you must also provide (or make sure that the state where the action will be carried out has):

  1. One certified copy of each order for current support that is now in effect.
  2. A payment record and/or affidavit of arrears for each of the orders.

The material in this document is taken from Interstate Actions Made Easy: A Quick‐Reference Guide to Enforcing Child Support Across State Lines (publication #4627A), a document prepared by the Training Staff of the New York State Division of Child Support Enforcement contracted through the Professional Development Program at Rockefeller College (NYS DCSE/PDP). This document is slightly modified from New York’s original training document by Oklahoma Child Support Services (OCSS) for child support training within Oklahoma.